Home / Health / AMNH’s Gem and Mineral Hall gets an amazing upgrade.

AMNH’s Gem and Mineral Hall gets an amazing upgrade.



New Minerals Hall at the American Museum of Natural History

New Minerals Hall at the American Museum of Natural History
photo: D. Finnin/©AMNH

If you love things that sparkle with the colors of the rainbow. glow in the dark And seemingly challenging the definition of stone, you must visit the new Halls of Gems and Minerals at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. I just got a preview of the new area. and as someone who grew up in the old hall I can assure you that this is a huge upgrade worthy of the museum’s amazing collection.

The Allison and Roberto Mignone Halls of Gems and Minerals will open June 12, marking the end of a four-year renovation in the Hall of Minerals of Harry Frank Guggenheim and JP Morgan. Memorial Hall of Gems, which houses over 200,000 gems and minerals in the museum. Unlike the old hall, this new hall is a bit dark, musty, and lacks easy-to-read science. The new foyer has high ceilings and a farsighted eye that allows you to simultaneously collect towering and colorful samples…information signs. It is understandable for children without being too easy for adults.

Jeweled butterfly from Beautiful Creatures.

Jeweled butterfly from Beautiful Creatures.
photo: Photo by David Behl © Belperron

The new exhibition hall supports older collections with recent acquisitions, such as two large geodesicists (12 feet and 9 feet tall) that welcome visitors into space. elegant temporary exhibition beautiful creatureShowcasing jewelry from the past 150 years (recalling the museum’s 150-year history) modeled after life in the natural world, such as the Salvador Dali-designed starfish, the entire gallery covers 11,000 square meters. feet and contains 5,000 samples from nearly 100 countries.

But the greatest achievement is how well the scientific facts about gemstones and minerals are integrated into the geographic and historical context. The story of these objects—from The “Garnet Subway,” a large geometric figure of the mineral found during a sewer excavation near Manhattan’s Herald Square. “Singing Stone,” a 7,200-pound block of blue azurite and green malachite, displayed at the 1893 Chicago Columbian Exposition.—Cooperating with spectroscopy and crystal lattice models in a way that makes the physics of rock formations accessible and exciting. Viewers can travel through the gallery using scenarios of object formation (ignite, metamorphic, pegmatic, hydrothermal. or weather) geographic discovery points or stories of their time in human hands for guidance.

The iconic “Singing Stone” takes center stage in the new exhibition hall.

The iconic “Singing Stone” takes center stage in the new exhibition hall.
image: Isaac Schultz

Mount Gore Plate

Mount Gore Plate
photo: D. Finnin/©AMNH

Curator George Harlow said science hasn’t changed much since the old hall was built. But some concepts have evolved further. And the new hall tells a better story about our understanding of the composition and its importance in science. and crystallography

A geodometist is nine feet tall.

A geodometist is nine feet tall.
photo: D. Finnin/©AMNH

“Forty years ago When the current gallery is designed Scientists have not yet begun to explore the concept of mineral evolution,” Harlow said in a statement. museum press release. “Today we work under a different framework. which minerals The abundance on our dynamic planet is directly linked to the evolution of life. Our new exhibit will allow us to tell how the mineral story is connected to the natural environment and the biology of minerals on one side. and with culture and technology on the other hand.”

large wall diagrams of various minerals shows such evolution Reminds you that diamonds are more ancient than gold. And, of course, much older than turquoise. The moving periodic table reveals the scarcity and abundance of the elements. By modifying the size of each element to show how many of them can be found on Earth, of course, if you want to skip reading all and just lose yourself in its strange beauty. captivating of the sample That’s the right choice. Too. Agate grapes from Sulawesi. Indonesia resembles lavender roe. The velvet malachite almost seduces the viewer with its soft texture. A nearby board, though, noted that the perceived softness was actually a collection of tiny, needle-like crystals. Large chunks of calcite and aragonite from Bisbee, Arizona look like Antarctic glaciers still frozen at room temperature. Elsewhere, minerals look like puffy green Cheetos, mounds of common wafers, moldy cheese and spores. Fuzzy. In the hall, familiar physics seem to be suppressed. Because the colorful minerals appear both soft and indestructible at once.

unusual grape chalcedony

unusual grape chalcedony
image: Isaac Schultz

Not all items on display have a comprehensive history. This is an unfortunate fact that many museums have such old collectibles, but the label is still a huge improvement over the older cards. which makes it difficult to link between the sample and the geological processes that shaped them..

and the job is not finished Instead of a boring dead end The new hall will open directly (through the “Crystalline Pass” according to the museum) to something new The 218,000-square-foot Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education and Innovation is an architecturally superb structure that will have Gallery spaces, classrooms, theatre and the beloved Butterfly Garden. Ready to open in late 2022

It’s a challenge to steal the spotlight in museums like AMNH, where wonders like life-sized blue whales are ceiling-mounted. But this new hall brought the periodic table to life. By turning the script up for anyone who thinks geology is boring.

More: Physicists Propose a Hunt for Signs of Dark Matter in Ancient Minerals


Source link