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Anthony Fauci: America’s Doctor Under Siege



On Saturday February 1, 2020 at approximately 6:45 p.m., Dr. Anthony Fauci dismissed the email. That probably made him the biggest controversy of his time as America’s most famous public scientist.

“Thank you Christian. Talk on the phone soon,” he wrote.

while the response is harmless Context also explodes, Kristian Andersen, a professor of immunology at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., told Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, that the virus causing the Covid-19 pandemic showed signs of being controlled. in the laboratory

Andersen̵

7;s message, published this week as part of Fauci’s 3,000-page email, dates back to the start of the pandemic. It helped support the theory that the disease started after a leak from the Wuhan Institute of Virology. Andersen later rejected that theory.

Email exchanges have intensified, claiming that Fauci overlooked the possibility of the lab leak even while chatting with other scientists about the potential advantages.

Now the man with the nickname “America’s Physicians” are facing calls to resign. And it has been heavily criticized by the right who argue that the pandemic may have its roots in wildlife. Instead of a laboratory in China

“There are many questions that need to be answered by Dr. Fauci,” said Donald Trump, a former president to whom Fauci served as an adviser. said after the e-mail was released. Trump supporters Many accused Fauci of exaggerating the severity of the pandemic. It has gone even further than that, Josh Hawley, a Republican senator from Missouri. demanded that Fauci resign

Fauci himself admitted to being worried. It’s not about going back. but about what it says about America. “It makes me worried about what is said about this country,” he told the Financial Times.

“The email shows that someone is constantly evaluating the data while they are developing. But people choose to pull out their emails to distort the truth.”

Fauci, 80, is one of America’s most famous and respected doctors.

After advising every president since Ronald Reagan, he succeeded the scientific world for his work on HIV in the 1980s when he was one of the first public physicians. that sounded the alarm about a new type of bizarre disease identified among gay men. He gained respect from gay activists after helping to change the way medical trials are conducted so that more people have access to potentially life-saving treatments.

“Tony Revolutionizes the Way Clinical Trials for HIV” Michael Osterholm Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. and said Fauci’s longtime friend. “He is an excellent doctor. But he is a natural leader. and know how to get things done.”

Fauci played a key role in the U.S. response to SARS, MERS and the 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak, when the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was criticized for the reaction.

“At one point the CDC was hit unfairly,” said Tom Frieden, who was the CDC director at the time. “A lot of people in that situation would have stood by or silently, but Tony did the opposite. He stood up for us inside and he stood up for us in public. He is a man.”

Fauci is one of the most prominent faces of the US response to Covid. He became known for his frequent television appearances in which he had frank conversations. and in the wider New York His work underscored the seriousness of the pandemic.

His willingness to dispute Trump’s claims, such as asserting that COVID-19 flu-like causing him to gain a huge army of fans

A park sign in Washington, D.C. and elsewhere declared “Thank you, Dr. Fauci.” His approval rating as of February was 60 percent, ahead of President Joe Biden, who now works as chief government adviser. physician

Others, however, believe he undermined Trump for political reasons. Paul Mango, deputy chief of staff for the Department of Health in the Trump administration, said: “Tony Fauci is a good person and a good scientist. Unfortunately, he built his own political personality. And that made him lose credibility”

Fauci denies this: “Sometimes I have to conflict with something. [Trump] speak because he is not right There seemed to be some violent people around. to believe that I am the enemy I’m not the enemy I’m just trying to reveal the truth.”

It was his reputation as a truth teller who was now under threat.

He allegedly helped fund risky research at the Wuhan lab through a $600,000 grant given by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. For working with coronavirus bats And his critics say his insistence that the disease’s origins likely lie in wildlife is no less evidence-based than his desire to protect his institution.

Fauci told the FT he still believed that An “overwhelming possibility” is that the Sars-Cov-2 virus is transferred to humans from animals.

But he also admitted that some work done in the Wuhan lab using NIH funds may violate safety standards. Although he said responsibility for that lies with the EcoHealth Alliance, the non-governmental group that operates it.

“We have to go back and look at that,” he said, referring to allegations that some coronavirus jobs were performed at biosecurity level 2, which is equivalent to jobs in a dentist office. “But that is something that should be reviewed by the EcoHealth Alliance.”

The EcoHealth Alliance says, “Like all research organizations, the EcoHealth Alliance must comply with the local laws of the countries in which we work.”

Fauci continued to answer emails until late at night. from professional colleagues, journalists and the general public “I’ve slept four hours now,” he said.

Friends worry about facing hard work and ongoing harassment from Trump supporters. He may soon decide to quit his public job. But he insists that won’t happen.

“I never thought of quitting,” he said. “I will have enough when we deal with this outbreak and we overcome it.”

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