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Brain organoids can spark ‘Planet of the Apes’ scenario



As research into lab-grown human ‘small brains’ into animals to study neurological diseases continues to expand, experts warn that working with these brain organs may result. The ‘Planet of the Apes’ scenario

What is worrying is that animals can develop human traits and begin to behave similar to those of the popular science fiction genius monkeys.

The warning comes from a Kyoto University team that published a paper highlighting the many ethical implications it could have on brain organ research.

Although many people view the organoid in the brain as a means of rapidly developing healing, others fear that because it is designed to mimic the real thing, they may also have a more sensible state of mind.

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Experts warn that working with these brain organs could result in a 'Planet of the Apes' situation (pictured) .The worrying thing is that animals can develop human traits and begin to behave similar to that of science fiction genius monkeys. Popular

Experts warn that working with these brain organs could result in a ‘Planet of the Apes’ situation (pictured) .What’s worrying about is that animals can develop human traits and begin to behave similar to that of science fiction genius monkeys. Popular

Tsutomu Sawai, Assistant Professor at Kyoto University, said: ‘This is too future. But that doesn’t mean we should wait to make decisions on ethical guidelines.

‘Concern is not so much animal biology that can occur in any organ, but moral humankind for the brain only.

The brain organoid, first created in 2008, is a 3-D ball of brain-like tissue grown from stem cells and often from humans.

Other stem cell research is to use animal tissues to grow organoids known as’ xeno-organisations. Which is transplanted into other animals

The brain organ (pictured), first created in 2008, is a 3-D ball of brain-like tissue grown from stem cells and often from humans.  Some people fear that because it is designed to mimic the real thing, they may also become sensible.

The brain organ (pictured), first created in 2008, is a 3-D ball of brain-like tissue grown from stem cells and often from humans. Some people fear that because it is designed to mimic the real thing, they might as well be sensible.

For example, scientists have had success in growing rat pancreas in mice and vice versa.

The work paves the way for pig human pancreas transplants, which can be later harvested for human organ transplantation.

However, the paper notes that these animals would live as organ farms for the benefit of mankind.

However, Sawai said there were more pressing problems.

One big problem is transplantation. Should we put the brain organoid in the animal to observe how the brain works? ‘

Sawai cautioned that doing so could result in increased animal abilities, which may sound like the popular Planet of the Apes.

This story has been popular since its debut in 1968 and again in 2017 as a remake.

Planet of the Apes takes place on a distant future planet where three astronauts have to get stuck and learn that the world is ruled by a smart ape.

While the growth of the human brain within animals is not under serious consideration, brain transplantation may provide important insights into how diseases such as dementia or schizophrenia form. And treatment to be cured

Brain organoids provide scientists with a new way to study the human brain – to better understand how it evolves into learning how many diseases arise.

While the growth of the human brain within animals is not under serious consideration, brain transplantation may provide important insights into how diseases such as dementia or schizophrenia form. And treatment to be cured  The picture is the cells in the brain organoid.

While the growth of the human brain within animals is not under serious consideration, brain transplantation may provide important insights into how diseases such as dementia or schizophrenia form. And treatment to be cured The picture is the brain organoid cells.

The topic, however, has been met with a wide range of signals in the scientific community, as some see the brain organoid as a way to rapidly develop a cure for the deadly brain disease, and others fear organoids. Grandma may achieve consciousness

The brain is the source of human consciousness, so if the organoids in the brain are just something smaller than the real thing, they should develop consciousness as well.

And Kyoto University papers state that this brings all sorts of moral consequences.

‘Mindfulness is a very difficult quality to define. We don’t have very good experimental techniques that confirm consciousness. Sawai, who has spent years writing about the ethics of brain organ research.

‘But even if we cannot prove consciousness, we should set a guideline because scientific advances require that.’

Another ethical issue of brain transplantation involves humans.  If something goes wrong, the mini-brain cannot be removed.  A picture is the process of growing an organ in the brain starting from three days to 10 days.

Another ethical issue of brain transplantation involves humans. If something goes wrong, the mini-brain cannot be removed. A picture is the process of growing an organ in the brain starting from three days to 10 days.

Another ethical issue of brain transplantation involves humans.

All pathways of brain organs point to transplantation in human patients with sudden trauma or trauma to the brain.

There have been several clinical trials involving brain cell transplantation as a cell therapy in patients with trauma or neurodegenerative disease.

Sawai said the ethics behind these therapies can act as a paradigm for the brain’s organs.

‘Cell transplant changes the way brain cells work If something goes wrong, we can’t get it out and start over, ‘said Sawai.

‘But now, cell transplants tend to be in one location.Organoids in the brain are expected to interact more deeply with the brain and more vulnerable to unexpected changes.’


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