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Facebook needs an AI that can beat ‘The hardest game in the world’



Real-time strategy, role-playing, and game building have become a fertile training ground for modern artificial intelligence systems in recent years. Digital competitors can easily defeat human opponents in everything from StarCraft II and Dota 2 to Minecraft Then there you go. Facebook is now enlisting the help of the AI ​​community to defeat NetHack, one of the hardest games in gaming history. And it may help computers learn to replicate instances faster with less resources.

NetHack is a tactical stomp strategy that goes through rogue-like dungeon crawlers. It was originally developed in the 1980s but is still being actively improved today. The game doesn̵

7;t expect you to win — expects you to die and you die in a bunch. All dungeons are all reset. The only way to really make the best of the game lies in your ability to combine luck. problem solving out of the box and old research skills at the NetHack Wiki to learn from the misfortune of the explorers that came before you.

As part of the NeurIPS 2021 NetHack Challenge, Facebook is inviting researchers to design, train, and publish AI systems that can “reliably develop agents that can beat games or In doing so, Facebook hopes to not only show the NetHack Learning Environment as a viable reinforcement learning system, but also to show the NetHack Learning Environment as a viable reinforcement learning system. It also enables the implementation of a wide variety of possible AI/ML solutions using neural and symbolic approaches.

“The candidate representative will play several games. Each game will feature random character roles and fantasy races,” the post explained Wednesday. “For a series of assessment episodes set for agents The average number of episodes the agent completes is calculated. along with the median of endgame scores in the game. Performances are ranked based on the average number of victories. and if the same will be sorted according to the median score.”

The competition runs from this month until October 15th, with the winners announced at NeurIPS in December.

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