Home / World / Keiko Fujimori claims ‘irregularities’ as rivals narrow the leadership in Peru’s presidential election | Peru

Keiko Fujimori claims ‘irregularities’ as rivals narrow the leadership in Peru’s presidential election | Peru



Keiko Fujimori, one of the two candidates who fought over the vote for the presidency of Peru. Allegations of fraud and counting irregularities last Sunday’s election. while her left-wing teacher, Pedro Castillo, led the narrow circle.

inter-US observers did not report any abnormalities. and said the ballot had passed correctly. in line with international standards

with more than 96% According to the official vote, the far-left candidate Castillo had a slight lead of about 0.2% over his far-right opponent. which has an advantage of almost 1

00,000 points.

But at a news conference on Monday, Fujimori, 46, claimed there were “several anomalies that worry us. And we think it’s important to highlight it.”

She accused Castillo’s Perú Libre party of using tactics to She has “distorted and slowed down results reflecting the will of popularity” by challenging the vote count, which she claims supports her Fuerza Popular party.

Later on Monday night Castillo speaks to a large support group in downtown Lima. and in a tweet urging them “Protect democracy as expressed in our vote. both in and out of our beloved Peru.”

Fujimori’s remarks attracted criticism from political figures and analysts who described it as a desperate act. As she appears to have almost lost her third election in 10 years.

Democratic presidential candidate Pedro Castillo greets supporters celebrating some of the election results that show him leading over Keiko Fujimori.
Democratic presidential candidate Pedro Castillo greets supporters celebrating some of the election results that show him leading over Keiko Fujimori. Photo: Martin Mejia / AP

“It is extremely sad that when the results are unsatisfactory, It’s terrible,” Fernando Tuesta, a political science professor at the Catholic University of Pontifical in Lima, told RPP radio on Monday night. “They talk about fraud because they don’t want to respect the results,” he said.

Fujimori, the daughter of imprisoned former president Alberto Fujimori, narrowly lost a second round of elections in 2011 to Ollanta Humala by just 3% of the vote, then in 2016 to Pedro Pablo Kuczynski by a smaller margin.

as a candidate Fujimori’s father – who served 25 years in prison for corruption and mass murder – and her own record as a politician playing against her.

Fujimori has also been accused of taking bribes. He is accused of taking more than $17 million in illegal campaign funds and heading a crime syndicate. and could face up to 30 years in prison if convicted. She denied the allegations, which she described as politically motivated.

Before the counting began, Nicholas Saldias, Latin America and Caribbean analyst at the Economist Intelligence Unit, predicted solid results. “It could be contested amid allegations of fraud.”

“Whoever wins the election will have very weak electoral power. This would make governing particularly difficult. Because neither Castillo nor Fujimori have a majority in the Legislature,” Saldias said.

Voting in countries affected by COVID-19 It divided the country between the rural poor Andes on the north coast and the wealthier capital Lima. The incident came amid the worst economic slowdown in the region. As a result, nearly 10% of Peru’s population suffers from poverty. Millions of people lost their jobs. and encourage many other countries to leave the big cities and returned to rural villages




Source link