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New report details Possible rare side effects of the coronavirus vaccine



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– Health officials are trying to determine whether heart inflammation can accompany many types of infections. It may be a rare side effect in adolescents and young adults after the second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. An article on seven US teens in several states is published online in Scientific American. PediatricsIt is one of the latest reports of heart inflammation discovered after the COVID-19 vaccination, although no link to the vaccine has been proven, the AP said. Boys aged 1

4 to 19 received a Pfizer vaccination in April or May and had chest pain within a few days. Cardiac imaging tests revealed a type of inflammation of the heart muscle called myocarditis. No one was seriously ill, said Dr. Preeti Chaggi, an infectious disease specialist at Emory University. said the report’s co-authors.

She said more follow-up was needed to determine the seven fares. But it is likely that the changes in the heart will be temporary. The case echoes a report from Israel in a young man diagnosed after the Pfizer shot. The CDC alerted doctors last month that it was following a small number of reports of heart inflammation in adolescents and young adults after the mRNA vaccine. produced by Pfizer and Moderna. The agency has not determined whether there is an actual link to the vaccination. And it continues to urge everyone aged 12 and over to be vaccinated against COVID-19, which is much more at risk than the vaccine. This type of heart inflammation can be caused by a variety of infections, including COVID-19 and certain medications, and has been reported rarely after other types of vaccination. Pediatrics The editorial said cases of heart inflammation needed further investigation, but added that “the benefits of vaccination against this serious and highly contagious disease outweigh the potential risks.”

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