Home / World / Rare amount of deposits in the world could bring down Greenland’s government: NPR

Rare amount of deposits in the world could bring down Greenland’s government: NPR



A giant iceberg floats in a fjord in the southern Greenland city of Narsaq, home to the Australian-led uranium and rare earth mining project. The open mines have shared opinions on the island, which will go into exploration on Tuesday.

NORDFOTO / AP


Hide subtitles

Switch subtitles

NORDFOTO / AP

A giant iceberg floats in a fjord in the southern Greenland city of Narsaq, home to the Australian-led uranium and rare earth mining project. The open mines have shared opinions on the island, which will go into exploration on Tuesday.

NORDFOTO / AP

Greenlanders are going to vote on Tuesday in a major election that could determine whether the Arctic is abundant with rare earths to fuel its eventual separation from Denmark.

The Greenland parliamentary election caught the attention of international companies looking for potentially lucrative reserves such as neodymium, an element used to make small and very strong permanent magnets for everything from electric cars to turbines. m The climate change-induced melting of Greenland’s ice cap has simplified access to those sources of funds, including other unconventional elements such as cerium and lanthanum.

The promise of such a reservation to create game-changing impulses for the island’s economy of just 56,000 has prompted Greenlanders to develop towards those who say the environment should come first.

Siumut Party which favors Self-determination But it also maintains close ties with Denmark.It has dominated Greenland’s legislature since the late 1970s.Today, Greenland has autonomy within the Kingdom of Denmark, dealing with the island’s foreign policy, finance and defense.

In 2013, Siumut repealed a law that prohibits the extraction of radioactive minerals such as uranium.

Overturning a ban on the Kvanefjeld project, which has been licensed for Greenland Minerals in Australia, with China-based Shenghe Resources the largest shareholder. The project is described as involved in one of the world’s largest deposits of rare earth minerals, including uranium.

Tuesday’s election comes after opponents of the mining project threatened the government with a vote of no confidence in Kvanefjeld.

Supporters of the project pointed out that Greenland could strengthen its economy, enabling it to accelerate the independence movement from Denmark, where surveys showed the island’s majority preferred it as the ultimate goal.

In Tuesday’s elections, the socially democratic Siumut was following the Inuit Ataqatigiit, or “Community of the People,” an independent left-wing supporter. But also supports the environment

While most Greenlanders view mining as a key to independence, the open-pit Kvanefjeld project has proved controversial for people like Aili Liimakka Laue, who moved last year to Narsaq at the time. South where the Kvanefjeld project is located

She said one side of the Kuannersuit Mountain overlooking the city was being destroyed by drilling tests for the mine project. She moved to the city last year. But a neighbor told her that one of the hills was the greenest.

“Right now, that area is all sand, and it’s just black,” she said. “There’s no green at all.”

Laue opposed the Australian-backed mining company with Chinese investors, calling it neo-colonialism.

“It is indirectly controlled by less developed countries,” she said. “It happens all over the world.”


Source link