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Researchers create a quantum microscope that sees the impossible



Australian researchers create a quantum microscope that sees the impossible

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7;s impression of UQ’s new quantum microscope. Credit: University of Queensland.

In a major scientific leap Researchers at the University of Queensland have created a quantum microscope that can reveal biological structures that might otherwise be invisible.

This paved the way for biotechnology applications. and can extend beyond that in various fields From navigation to medical imaging

This microscope is powered by the science of quantum entanglement. which is an effect that Einstein described as “Awesome interactions at a distance”

Professor Warwick Bowen from UQ’s Quantum Optics Lab and ARC’s Center of Excellence for Quantum Systems Engineering (EQUS) said this was the first entanglement-based sensor to outperform the best of its technology. can go

“This breakthrough will spark all kinds of new technologies, from better navigation to better MRI machines, you can tell,” Professor Bowen said.

“Entanglement is thought to be at the heart of the quantum revolution.

“We have finally shown that this sensor-based sensor can replace existing non-quantum technologies.

“This is exciting—the first testament to the paradigm-changing potential of cognitive entanglement.”

The Australian Quantum Technology Roadmap sees quantum sensors creating a new wave of technological innovation in healthcare, engineering, transportation and resources.

Australian researchers create a quantum microscope that sees the impossible

A team of UQ researchers (counterclockwise from bottom left) Caxtere Casacio, Warwick Bowen, Lars Madsen and Waleed Muhammad aligned the quantum microscope. Credit: University of Queensland.

A key achievement of the team’s quantum microscope is its ability to shoot through. ‘Solid barrier’ in traditional light microscopy

A team of UQ researchers (counterclockwise from bottom left) Caxtere Casacio, Warwick Bowen, Lars Madsen and Waleed Muhammad aligned the quantum microscope.

“The best optical microscopes use bright lasers that are billions of times brighter than the sun,” says Professor Bowen.

“Fragile biological systems such as human cells can survive for short periods of time and this is a major obstacle.

“Quantum entanglement in our microscope allows for 35 percent greater vision without damaging cells. It allows us to see little biological structures that may not be visible.

“The benefits are clear. From a better understanding of living systems to better diagnostic technology.”

Professor Bowen said there are boundless opportunities for quantum entanglement in technology.

Researchers create a quantum microscope that sees the impossible

UQ’s quantum microscopy is poised to zero in previously unseen biology. Credit: University of Queensland.

“Entanglement is set to revolutionize processing, communication and perception,” he said.

“Extremely secure communication was demonstrated decades ago. This is the first demonstration of a true quantum advantage over conventional technology.

“Calculations are faster than any conventional computer that Google demonstrated two years ago. This is the first demonstration of the true computing advantage.

“The last piece in the puzzle was touched. And now we’ve closed that gap.

“This opens the door to a broad technological revolution.”

The research was published in nature.


Quantum holds the key to securing a conference call.


More information:
Quantum-enhanced nonlinear microscopy nature (2021). doi: 10.1038/s41586-021-03528-w , www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-03528-w

Provided by the University of Queensland.



reference: Researchers Build a Quantum Microscope That Sees the Impossible (2021, June 9) Retrieved June 9, 2021 from https://phys.org/news/2021-06-quantum-microscope-impossible. html

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