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Rounded rock planets and the Super Blood Moon eclipse.




credit: NASA/JPL̵

1; Caltech

Highlights of May Skywatching

What’s up in May? This month, the rocky planets and the bloody moon eclipse are super!

  • May 3: The brightest planet Saturn Will appear to the left of the half moon.
  • May 4: The moon is a large triangle in the east-southeast, with the bright planets Saturn and Jupiter.
  • Mid May: You will have the opportunity to see the four stony inner planets of our solar system at the same time with your own eyes.
  • 26 May: See the total lunar eclipse during the second super moon of 2021.

From mid-May onwards, if you can see the western horizon clearly, you will have the opportunity to see all four stony inner planets of our solar system at the same time.

See the four inner planets

See the four inner planets (And the world too!) After sunset starting mid-May. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech.

Starting around May 14, gaze west about half an hour after sunset to see if you can see Mercury. Venusand Mars. (And, well, Earth is hard to miss)

To see near the horizon, you need an unobstructed view – free of nearby trees and buildings. Some of the best places are shores, lakes or beaches, in open plains or high up in mountains or tall buildings.

In addition to the planets, from about the 14th to the 17th, the crescent moon joins the party for a lovely planetary prop. Now Venus is really low in the sky. (It’s easier to observe in the summer.) But for now, take advantage of this opportunity to observe all of the inner planets in one view.

The moon is red during a lunar eclipse.

The moon normally appears red during a lunar eclipse as sunlight filters through the Earth’s atmosphere.Credit: NASA Scientific Images Studio.

May 26 A total lunar eclipse occurs. Over the hours, the moon moves through the Earth’s shadow, darkening it and often turning red. Red comes from sunlight that has filtered through the Earth’s atmosphere, the ring of light produced by all the rising suns and sunsets that took place around our planet at that time.

Because it is red in color, it is often called a lunar eclipse. “Blood Moon” how red it will look, it is difficult to predict. But dust in the atmosphere can have an impact. (And note that there have been a few notable volcanic eruptions recently.)

A lunar eclipse occurs when the full moon and the full moon occur when the moon is closest to the Earth in its orbit, often referred to as a “super moon”.

Unlike eclipses you shouldn’t be looking at. But watching the eclipse with your eyes is safe. And unlike solar eclipses, which tend to have a narrower path of vision, at least partial eclipses can be seen anywhere on the planet’s night side.

Global visibility May 2021 lunar eclipse

This map shows the global visibility of the May 2021 lunar eclipse.Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech.

Now, eclipses occur around the same time, no matter where on earth you are. But the time your watch reads during the eclipse depends on your time zone. The best spot to view the eclipse is on the Pacific edge, which is western America, Australia, New Zealand and eastern Asia. For the United States, the best views are in Hawaii, Alaska, and the western states.

Visibility of the US May 2021 lunar eclipse

A May 2021 lunar eclipse is best seen in Hawaii, Alaska, and the western United States. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech.

For the US East Coast, the eclipse will begin for you at twilight. You may notice the first part of the eclipse as the moon is just beginning to get dark. But the moon will be near or on the horizon when the Earth’s shadow begins to cover.

The further west you are, the more eclipse you will see before the moon falls that morning. Those in the western half of the country will be able to see most of the eclipses.

So if you are in the path of this eclipse please check your local times for the best viewing near you. And if you’re in the US, please be prepared. Early if you want to watch this rare celestial event: a super-bloody moon eclipse.

Daily manual

1 May: May day

Saturday 1 May 2021 will be May Day. We now divide the year into four seasons according to the summer solstice and on the vinox, with summer beginning the summer solstice in June. This period coincides with summer in the warmest quarter of the year.

Most Northern Europeans, before the Christian era, celebrate the “quarter day,” halfway between the solstice and the Vinox, dividing the seasons today. Using an older definition, summer is the quarter of the year with the longest daylight of the day, beginning with Belten, which is traditionally celebrated on May 1st (our mid-spring). Many European May Day traditions date back to the earlier celebrations of the onset of summer.

May 3

On Monday morning, May 3, 2021, the planet Saturn appears to the left of the half moon. Saturn appears about 8 degrees to the left of the moon, while both rise east-southeast at 2:22 AM EDT. Saturn appears about 7 degrees to the left of the moon at dusk at dawn. Start at 05:03

On Monday afternoon, the moon will appear full and half moons as it reaches the last quarter at 3:50 p.m. EDT.

May 4

By Tuesday morning, May 4, 2021, the moon will move in a large triangle in the east-southeast, with the planets Saturn and Jupiter. Saturn will first rise at 2:17 AM EDT. The moon and Jupiter will rise to the lower left of Saturn at the same time at 3:01 AM and 3:02 AM with Jupiter away from the moon. About 10 degrees, the moon will appear approximately 18 degrees above the horizon in the southeast by the time twilight of the morning begins at 5:02 a.m.

May 5

By Wednesday morning, May 5, 2021, the moon will shift approximately 6 degrees lower than Jupiter, rising east-southeast at 03:33 AM EDT, approximately 1.5 hours before early twilight at 5:01 AM. There is a farther away Saturn in the upper right.

11 May

On Tuesday afternoon, May 11, 2021 at approximately 1:24 p.m. EDT (2021 – 11 May 17:24 UTC with 12 minutes of uncertainty), near-earth objects (2021 GK1) between 33 and 74 feet (10 and 23 meters). ) Will pass the Earth at a distance of 1.5 stars traveling at a speed of 4,500 miles per hour (2.01 kilometers per second).

Tuesday at 3:00 p.m. EDT will be a new moon as the moon passes between the Earth and the Sun and will be invisible from the Earth. As the new moon is closest to the Earth in its orbit, some of the moons have begun to use the term. “Small Moon” to indicate the opposite of “Super Moon”.

At 5:54 p.m. EDT, the moon will be at its highest, farthest from Earth for this orbit.

11-12 May.

The day of – or the day after – the new moon is the start of the new month for most lunar calendars. The sunset on May 11, 2021 marks the beginning of Sivan in the Hebrew calendar. The fourth month of the Chinese calendar starts on May 12, 2021 (midnight Chinese time zone, which is 12 hours slower than EDT) in the Islamic calendar.The month begins with the first seen waxed crescent moons after the moon. New monday Depends on whether or not to see the crescent moon. (For many Muslim communities seen from the holy city of Mecca) a sunset on Wednesday, May 12, 2021 may mark the beginning of Shawwal and the end of the holy month of Ramadan. It marks the end of Ramadan fasting and the beginning of Eid, a feast that can last up to three days in some countries.

In the early morning of Wednesday, May 12, 2021, you may see a very thin crescent, waxed at the lowest western-northwest horizon, appearing to the left of Venus from about 30 minutes after sunset to both. Set the scene 5 minutes before the twilight ends. However, the sky may be too bright and the crescent moon is too thin to be seen without the use of binoculars or a telescope.

May 13, 2017

In the early morning of Thursday, May 13, 2021, Mercury appears to the right of the thin, waxed crescent moon about 3 degrees, both appearing about 8 degrees northwest of the horizon when The twilight ends (9:19 p.m. EDT) and Mercury will first set the scene approximately 47 minutes later at 10:06 p.m. with the moon about 6 minutes later.

15 May

Saturday evening, May 15, 2021 will be when Mercury will peak above the horizon when the twilight ends for this appearance, about 7 degrees above the west-northwest horizon.

Additionally, on Saturday evening, the waxing crescent moon will appear in the west-northwest to the lower right of Mars, both set at around midnight.

16 May

By Sunday night, May 16, 2021, the wax crescent moon shifts to appear at the bottom left of the bright Pollux star, both set about 3.5 hours after the twilight has ended. (Monday morning around 12:49 AM EDT)

17 May

Monday morning, May 17, 2021 will be when Mercury reaches its greatest angular separation from the Sun when viewed from the Earth for this appearance. (Called maximum elongation), half appearing through a large enough telescope. As the angle of the line between the Sun and Mercury and the horizon changes with the seasons, the days when Mercury and the sun appear the most farthest when viewed from Earth, are not the same as when Mercury appears highest above the horizon when the twilight ends. Down.

19 May

On Wednesday afternoon, May 19, 2021, the moon will appear in the first quarter at 3:13 p.m. EDT starting on Wednesday evening, the bright planet Venus will join Mercury over the west-northwest horizon. When the twilight of the evening is over

19-20 May

From Wednesday night to Thursday morning, May 19 to May 20, a half-full moon will appear above the bright Regulus star, with Regulus set for the first Thursday morning around 2:07 a.m. EDT.

23-24 May

From Sunday night to Monday morning, 23 through 24 May, the waxed gibbons will appear to the left of the bright star Spica, starting about 7 degrees apart and separating throughout the night, with Spica setting up once. First on Monday morning around 3:52 a.m. EDT.

Late May or early June 2021 (2021 – 25 May 9:26 UTC with 7 days, 17 hours, 11 minutes of uncertainty), near-earth objects (2013 VO11) are between 19 and 43 feet (6 and 13). Meters) will pass the Earth at a distance of 3.1 to 43.4.The moon (nominal 3.4) travels at a speed of 22,800 miles per hour (10.18 kilometers per second).

25 May

Tuesday night, May 25, 2021 at 9:51 p.m. EDT, the moon will be closest to Earth for this orbit.

26 May

May 26 A total lunar eclipse occurs. Over the hours, the moon moves through the Earth’s shadow, darkening it and often turning red. Red comes from sunlight that has filtered through the Earth’s atmosphere, the ring of light produced by all the rising suns and sunsets that took place around our planet at that time.

The best spot to view the eclipse is on the Pacific edge, which is western America, Australia, New Zealand and eastern Asia. For the United States, the best views are in Hawaii, Alaska, and the western states.

A lunar eclipse occurs when the full moon and the full moon occur when the moon is closest to the Earth in its orbit, often referred to as a “super moon”.

This is the second super moon of 2021 and takes place at 7:14 a.m. EDT Wednesday (the first super moon of the year is April 26) .The moon will appear in full from Monday evening to morning. Thursday

Preston Dyches, Christopher Harris and Lisa Poje are science communicators and space enthusiasts who produced this video for NASA at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.Additional guides on astronomy were provided by Bill Dunford, Gary Spiers, and Lyle Tavernier.

Gordon Johnston, a retired NASA program manager, offers daily advice.




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