Home / Business / So why are both sides clinging to the maverick Texas mayor’s race?

So why are both sides clinging to the maverick Texas mayor’s race?



What happened in Tarrant County was closely watched inside and outside the state. As Republican stronghold Tarrant has seen GOP gross margins plummet in recent years — a narrow victory for President Joe. Biden there in November marked the first time in more than half a century the Democratic presidential nominee oversees the county. If the county continues to move to the left would affect the balance of electoral power across the state.

“We’ve never had these sectarian contests,” said Kenneth Bar, former mayor of Fort Worth, who led the city from the Democratic Party from 1996 to 2003. The city government is not allowed to hold the main partisans, and this election has gone as far in the direction of the partisans as we have before.”

The influx of Republicans Mattie Parker, a former aide of Price, and Deborah Peoples, a retired AT&T Democrat, both confirmed they were running a nonpartisan campaign.

Somewhat true: Parker has denied any GOP endorsement of her general election campaign, and Peoples backed away from activism with national democratic groups supporting her campaign. Central to the competition is the question of how Fort Worth will change as the city continues to grow – it is now the 12th largest city in the country. Raise and bring public safety issues into a sharper focus for voters in light of the 2020 increase in violent crime.

But the county’s Republican continued to call and knock on Parker’s behalf, and Texas GOP Gov. Greg Abbott endorsed her on Wednesday. In particular, it underscored her support for law enforcement — and contrary to the Peoples record.

For her part, Peoples, the former Democratic chairman of Tarrant County, has been endorsed by prominent national and state Democratic groups and national Democrats, including former Texas Representative Beto. O’Rourke, former San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro and the Democratic National Committee Jaime Harrison Chair

The Collective PAC, which helps select black candidates for office Hundreds of thousands of dollars in a race to try and get the city’s black voters to support the Peoples, who will become the city’s first black mayor.

Republicans worry that Fort Worth’s rapid growth is not merely a change in the city’s traditional character and politics. But it also moves in line with the state’s four largest cities: Houston, San Antonio, Dallas and Austin. Those cities often power Democratic candidates in elections across the country. state

“There is a big concern here that if you end up with a Democratic mayor. It will change what people know Fort Worth is,” said Tarant County Republican Rick Barnes.

The ongoing national debate over race and treatment has increased partisan bets. Republicans are trying to make the race part of a referendum on Democratic leadership in other cities across the country, against the backdrop of ongoing conversations about police funding in Austin and beyond. This topic became the biggest topic of discussion on the last day.

with the mayor of the Democratic Party Republicans argue that Fort Worth is susceptible to scenes of chaos and violence in some major US cities. More than last summer

“We see more of what Democrats do to Austin than Dallas. but both cities [have] Democratic Mayor. And when you add in Houston and San Antonio The people of Fort Worth refuse to let their city go in that direction,” Barnes said.

In an interview with Star-Telegram Abbott describes People’s reform-focused stance in healthcare: He and Republicans in other states have tried to portray her as an opponent of law enforcement.

While the People’s Campaign Platform calls for reallocation of funds from law enforcement to community policing initiatives. She has avoided the word “Protect the police”

But her opposition to the 2020 taxpayer-funded police budget referendum has given Republican critics some ammunition. While the majority of voters in Fort Worth go through crime control and prevention districts. Half the tax that helps pay for police equipment. as well as the presence of staff at special events and in schools. people objected He said that people should have more information on how to spend money.

Fort Worth City Councilor Carrie Moon said: “You can’t deny the fact that she went out there trying to overcome this. She was on the wrong side of that issue.” “I think that might be a big problem people see – and they don’t want a refund to the police.”

People, who highlighted racial inclusion as part of her platform. has called himself “A progressive change maker”

“what [Fort Worth] The leadership is ongoing now excluding the entire population of the city. We are a city with minorities,” Peoples said in an interview. “Our biggest issue is ensuring that all of us across the city benefit from the rapid growth we are seeing.”

The public criticized Parker for accepting the governor’s endorsement. It alleges that the governor supported a voting bill proposed by Republicans in the state legislature that would restrict access to ballots for black, Latino and low-income voters. at least several million people

“This endorsement makes it clear that Mattie Parker will accept Abbott’s split as mayor,” she tweeted.

Parker admits that pulling on national politics has intensified the competition.

“Something is just what is happening across the country that seems to translate here. Whether it’s a problem here or not,” said Parker, who is endorsed by the city’s union of police officers and firefighters. And now we are the 12th largest city, sometimes we never talk about difficult things. that the growing city must always be talking about.”

Fort Worth’s voting pattern — elected mayor by both Democrats and Republicans in the past few decades — has made Saturday’s outcome difficult to resist. Peoples speculates are the top voters in the May 1 general election, but Parker has insisted on getting the ballot from more conservative candidates than some who were eliminated.

“Anyone who works for the mayor’s office is trying to follow through. ‘I do this for Republican control or Democrats’ will lose,” said Brian Mayes, a media strategist in Texas who cut ads for the Parker campaign. [in Fort Worth] Just always had a free streak.”




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