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Study finds 40K children need support after losing their parents from COVID-19



As life gets back to normal for many children heading back to school this month, a new study shows that some 40,000 children in the United States are grieving after losing their parents to COVID. -19 They are now known as “COVID Orphans” and have a new goal of helping them both immediately and with long-term support. The researchers who led the study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Pediatrics (JAMA Pediatrics) .Their model looked at the deaths of COVID-19 from February 2020 to February 2021. He found that as many as 43,000 children lost at least one parent from COVID-19, studies have shown that older children are especially affected. Researchers found that about 1

1,000 people who lost their parents under the age of 10, and about 32,000 people aged 10 and older, African-American children were disproportionately affected. They make up 14% of the children in our country, but 20% of those who lose their parents from the virus. Note that the model does not track the number of children who have lost both parents and does not include other primary caregivers such as grandparents who may have been killed by COVID-19. The researchers behind the study said children injured by the loss of their parents were at risk of depression, poor study results and unintentional death or suicide. People working with at-risk children pointed out that these losses were due to other hardships of the epidemic, including unemployed parents and children lost in schools as their campuses were closed. Berry Accius, founder of Voice of the Youth, Inc., warns that the effects on these children can last decades, and the layers of damage from the outbreak could make it harder to treat than the Accius virus, hopefully these concerns. This will lead to huge investments in community centers and other services that can help these children over the long term. “We have to make sure these children are doing well,” Accius explains. ‘This is two years, this is the time of two.’ If that child wants forever and one day, we have to focus on forever, and in a day, how will you cope with the loss of your parents when you And let’s be clear, many of these children are nowhere else but their parents and family members. ”The authors of the study are now calling for the creation of a conspiracy group. National Childhood or A “cohort” that identifies children who have lost their parents, examines signs that they need help and care as quickly as possible. Early intervention is often important, and Accius says what these children need the most is. “Lots of love, lots of support, a lot of understanding.” For more information on helping children deal with grief, click here.

As life gets back to normal for many children heading back to school this month, a new study shows that some 40,000 children in the United States are grieving after losing their parents to COVID. -19

They are now known as “COVID Orphans” and there is a new focus on helping them immediately and with long-term support.

The researchers who led the study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Pediatrics (JAMA Pediatrics) .Their model looked at the deaths of COVID-19 from February 2020 to February 2021. He found that as many as 43,000 children lost at least one parent from COVID-19.

Studies have shown that older children are especially affected. Researchers found that about 11,000 people lost their parents under 10, and about 32,000 were aged 10 and older.

African American children are disproportionately affected. They make up 14% of the children in our country, but 20% of those who lose their parents from the virus.

Please note that the model does not track the number of children who have lost both parents and does not include other primary caregivers such as grandparents who may have been killed by COVID-19.

Obviously, the impact was profound. The researchers behind the study said children injured by the loss of their parents were at risk of depression, poor study results and unintentional death or suicide.

People working with at-risk children pointed out that these losses were due to other hardships of the epidemic, including unemployed parents and children lost in schools as their campuses were closed.

Berry Accius, founder of Voice of the Youth, Inc., warns that the effects on these children can last decades, and the layers of damage from the outbreak could make it harder to treat than the Accius virus, hopefully these concerns. This will lead to large investments in community centers and other services that can help these children over the long term.

“We have to make sure these kids are fine,” Accius explains. ‘This is two years, this is the time of two years.’ If that child wants forever and one day, we have to value forever, and in a day, how will you cope with the loss of your parents when you ‘Lost everything? And let’s be clear, many of these children were never anything else but their parents and family members.’

The authors of the study are calling for the creation of a national child bereavement group or A “cohort” that identifies children who have lost their parents, examines signs that they need help and care as quickly as possible.

Early intervention is often important, and Accius says what these children need the most is. “Lots of love, lots of support.

To find out more about helping children deal with grief, click here.


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