Home / Health / Study reveals that listening to ‘earthworms’ before bedtime affects sleep.

Study reveals that listening to ‘earthworms’ before bedtime affects sleep.



Many of us listen to music before bed to relax. But a new study suggests this can seriously compromise our nightly rest.

Experts in Texas found that people who listened to bedtime music more often had ‘earworms,’ which are catchy tunes that linger in their minds. as well as worse sleep

Nematodes often affect people while they are awake. But studies have shown that they can happen while trying to sleep.

People who regularly experience earworms at night – once or more per week – are six times more likely to have poor sleep quality compared to those who rarely experience earworms.

The results contradict the idea that music is hypnotic and may even aid sleep. In fact, the sleeping brain continues to process music for hours after it stops.

The study used three very catchy songs: Taylor Swift̵

7;s ‘Shake It Off’, Carly Rae Jepsen’s ‘Call Me Maybe’ and Journey’s ‘Don’t Stop Believin’.

Studies suggest that you should avoid listening to music before bedtime.  especially if you are annoyed with

Studies suggest that you should avoid listening to music before bedtime. Especially if you’re annoyed by “Earwax,” a catchy song that repeats itself over and over again.

What are EARWORMS?

Earworms are times when a song or song plays over and over in a person’s mind.

It is often the main hook of a song, such as the chorus.

Earworms can be caused by both lyrical and instrumental songs.

Research shows that these negatively affect sleep quality.

Led by Michael Scullin, an associate professor of psychology and neuroscience at Baylor University. He had previously woken up in the middle of the night with music stuck in his head.

“Almost everyone thinks that music can help them sleep better. But we found that the more people who listened to music, the harder it was to sleep,” he said.

‘Our brains are still processing music even when no song is playing. Including obviously we were asleep.

‘Everyone knows that listening to music makes me feel good. Teenagers and young adults often listen to music near bedtime.

‘But sometimes you can have too much of a good thing. The more you listen to music The more likely you are to have an earworm that won’t go away at bedtime.

‘When that happens Chances are your sleep will be miserable.’

Surprisingly, studies have found that certain instrumental music is more likely to cause otitis media and disturb sleep quality than lyrical music.

This contradicts the idea that instrumental music is more relaxing. Or lyrical music often has more prominent hooks that loop through our brains.

Professor Scullin said: “What a real surprise. is that playing music worsens the quality of sleep. Instrumental music causes more than twice the number of nematodes,” said Professor Scullin.

The study used three catchy songs - Taylor Swift's 'Shake It Off' (pictured), Carly Rae Jepsen's 'Call Me Maybe' and Journey's 'Don't Stop Believin'.

The study used three catchy songs – Taylor Swift’s ‘Shake It Off’ (pictured), Carly Rae Jepsen’s ‘Call Me Maybe’ and Journey’s ‘Don’t Stop Believin’.

HOW TO AVOID EARWORMS

Professor Scullin recommends that people take care of their music or take occasional breaks if they are infested by earworms. And try to avoid this before bedtime.

‘If you always pair up listening to music while in bed. You’ll have a relationship where being in that context can cause tinnitus even if you’re not listening to music, like when you’re trying to fall asleep,’ he says.

Another way to get rid of earwax is to engage in cognitive activities – focusing fully on a task, problem, or activity will help distract the brain from the nematodes.

Near bedtime, instead of doing strenuous activities or things that would interfere with your sleep, such as watching TV or playing video games, it may take 5-10 minutes to write a to-do list and write down your thoughts on a piece of paper.

An earlier study found that participants who spent five minutes writing their upcoming tasks before going to bed helped ‘pump’ those future-worried thoughts and get them to sleep faster.

Health organizations often recommend listening to soft music before bed, but most of these recommendations are based on self-study.

For example, the NHS website states that music is a way to beat insomnia. and the US government’s National Institutes of Health. It also states that listening to music is the secret to a good night’s sleep.

Professor Scullin recommends that people take care of their music or take occasional breaks if they are infested by earworms. And try to avoid this before bedtime.

‘If you always pair up listening to music while in bed. You’ll have a relationship where being in that context can cause tinnitus even if you’re not listening to music, like when you’re trying to fall asleep,’ he says.

The study published in the journal Psychological Science involves exploration and laboratory experiments.

The survey involved 209 participants who completed a series of surveys on sleep quality. listening behavior and the frequency of ear parasites including how often they experience earworms while trying to sleep. Waking up in the middle of the night and waking up immediately .

In the experimental study, 50 participants were taken into the Scullin Sleep and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory at Baylor University. The research team tried to induce nematodes to determine how they affect sleep quality.

Participants were equipped with equipment. Polysomnography which measures brain waves, breathing, muscle tension movement heart activity, etc., while sleeping

but before going to bed They played three annoying catchy hits: ‘Shake It Off’, ‘Call Me Maybe’ and ‘Don’t Stop Believin’.

Professor Scullin said: “We randomly assigned participants to either listen to the original versions of those songs or the transcripted versions of the songs.”

‘Participants responded if and when they found earworms. We then analyzed whether that affects nocturnal sleep physiology.

‘People who catch worms in their ears have a harder time sleeping. waking up more at night and take time to sleep more lightly.’

The experimental study also used electrocardiogram (EEG), a method of recording the electrical activity of the brain involving electrodes placed on the scalp.

EEG readings were quantitatively analyzed to examine physiological markers of sleep-dependent memory consolidation.

Memory consolidation is the process by which temporary memories are transformed into more long-term forms.

Participants with sleep ear pathology experienced slower tremors during sleep. which is a marker of reactivation of memory where memory is taken from an idle state to an active state.

The slow increase in oscillation predominates the region corresponding to the primary auditory cortex. which involves the processing of nematodes when people are awake

Professor Scullin said: “We think people have earwax when they go to bed at bedtime. But it is not known for certain that people will wake up from sleep with nematodes on a regular basis.”

‘But we saw that in both the survey and the experimental study.’

four stages of sleep

step-by-step pictures  of the sleep cycle at night  Most dreams occur during REM sleep (red marker), although some can occur in non-REMM sleep.

step-by-step pictures of the sleep cycle at night Most dreams occur during REM sleep (red marker), although some can occur in non-REMM sleep.

Sleep is generally divided into four stages. These three things are called ‘Not fast eye movement’ or NREM sleep

The final stage is called rapid eye movement or REM sleep.

Night sleep generally alternates between different phases.

Stage 1: During the first five minutes or so after getting out of the car We do not sleep deeply

We remain aware of our surroundings. But our muscles begin to relax. slow heart rate And the brain wave patterns known as theta waves are irregular but fast.

Even if we fall asleep in the first stage, we may wake up from feeling like we haven’t slept at all.

After about five minutes Our bodies will move into the second phase.

stage 2: This is when we fell asleep. And if we wake up, we’ll know that we’re asleep. Waking up is still relatively easy.

This distance is indicated by a short burst. of electrical activity in the brain known as the spindle and large waves called K-complexes, indicating that the brain is still aware of what is happening around it before it goes off to the subconscious level.

slow heartbeat and breathing and muscles more relaxed

Our body temperature drops and eye movements stop.

slower brain wave activity but was marked by a brief explosion of electrical activity.

Stage 3: Stage 3 non-REM sleep is a deep sleep in which we must feel refreshed in the morning.

It happened over a long period of time in the first half of the night.

Our heartbeats and breathing slow down to their lowest level during sleep and our brain waves slow down.

Our muscles are relaxed and people may find it difficult to wake us up.

The body repairs muscles and tissues. stimulate growth and development stimulate immune function and generate energy for the next day

Hypnagogia – the transitional state between wakefulness and sleep – is associated with stages one to three of NREM.

The mental phenomena during hypnosis include lucid thoughts, lucid dreams, hallucinations, and sleep paralysis.

REM sleep: The first REM sleep occurs approximately 90 minutes after falling asleep.

Our eyes move quickly from side to side behind closed eyelids.

Mixed-frequency brainwave activity is similar to that seen in arousal.

Our breathing is faster and irregular. The heart rate and blood pressure almost reached waking levels.

Most dreams occur during REM sleep, although some can occur in non-REM sleep.

The muscles of the arms and legs are temporarily paralyzed. which prevents us from following our dreams

when getting older We spend less time in REM sleep.

Memory consolidation often requires both non-REM and REM sleep modes.

Source: US National Institutes of Health.


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