Home / Health / The 105-year-old received a second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

The 105-year-old received a second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.



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Surry County, 105, received a second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

More and more people waited for a chance to be vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus, but Myrtle Wagoner remembered growing up in a different outbreak.


Lots of people were looking forward to getting the COVID-19 vaccine, but Myrtle Wagoner remembered growing up in a different pandemic. say Avian influenza outbreak 105-year-old Wagoner was excited to receive her first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine earlier this month. “Well, I didn’t even know you vaccinated me,” said Wagoner. But for the second dosing on Wednesday, she was sure to look at the entire process. “I just want to see how long the needle is in my arm.” She has long-term goals for the days ahead, such as renewing her driving license when her license expires in 2023. Going to celebrate the vaccination by going to the hairdresser “Friday I put my name on and I have to go,” said Wagoner. “I’ll finish it, wash it, curl and let it stand a little,” she encouraged everyone. “Get the vaccine and you will live longer,” she said. “That’s what I did.”

More and more people waited for a chance to be vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus, but Myrtle Wagoner remembered growing up in a different outbreak.

“I was two years old when I had the flu,” Wagoner said.

After the influenza pandemic in 1918, 105-year-old Wagoner was excited to receive his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine earlier this month.

“It’s fine, I didn’t even know she had vaccinated for me,” Wagoner said. But for the second dosing on Wednesday, she was sure to look at the entire process.

“Well, I just want to see how long the needle is in my arm.”

She has long-term goals for the days ahead, such as renewing her driver’s license when it expires in 2023, but in the meantime, she’ll celebrate vaccination by visiting a hair salon.

“Friday, I have a name, I have to go,” said Wagoner. “I’ll finish it, wash it, roll it up, and let it stand up a bit.”

She encouraged everyone that “Get the vaccine and you will live longer,” she said. “That’s what I did.”


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