Home / Science / The debris from Halley’s Comet to the night sky that shines bright for the next few days.

The debris from Halley’s Comet to the night sky that shines bright for the next few days.



The Eta Aquatic meteor shower peaks during the first week of May.
The Eta Aquatic meteor shower peaks during the first week of May.

Observers in the night sky will have a special treat this week: The debris from the tail of Halley’s comet will provide a platform for a meteor shower that will likely delight the naked eye with streaks of a meteor, according to NASA’s Meteorite. Eta Aquarid is known for its speed. Traveling at a speed of about 148,000 miles per hour into Earth’s atmosphere, a fast meteorite can leave a glowing “train” that lasts from seconds to minutes. These trains are the remnants of a meteor awakening. Typically 30 Eta Aquarid meteorites per hour can be seen during their peak.

Fragments of space debris that interact with Earth’s atmosphere to form Eta Aquarids originate from Halley’s Comet. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory reports that each time Halley re-enters the inner solar system, its nucleus releases layers of ice and rock into space. Eventually, the dust will become Eta Aquarids in May and Orionids in October if they collide with Earth’s atmosphere.

While comet debris will light up the night sky this week, don’t expect to see Halley’s comet for a while. It takes Halley approximately 76 years to orbit the Sun once. The last time Halley was seen by a casual observer was in 1986; It will not enter the inner solar system until 2061.

Although the comet will not show for another 40 years, Eta Aquarids should make a good show around the world. The best viewing of the meteorites should be before dawn on Wednesday, May 5, however, the meteor shower will begin on May 4 and last until May 6, pre-dawn in both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. It’s the best time to watch it. In the Southern Hemisphere, the Southern Hemisphere has a better chance of seeing the meteor than the Northern Hemisphere.

The Eta Aquarid meteorite crosses northern Georgia on April 29, 2012.Image: NASA / MSFC / B Cooke.
The Eta Aquarid meteorite crosses northern Georgia on April 29, 2012.Image: NASA / MSFC / B Cooke.

The best places to see are far from sources of light pollution: city lights and streets can block the faint streaks that will be visible on a dark night. Astronomers advised observers to lie on their backs with their feet facing east. When you look up at the dark and clear sky, your eyes should adjust to low light conditions and you should be able to see the meteorites streak across the night sky. Of course, in addition to being in an area free of light pollution, you also have to be in a cloudless area (See the local forecast for your area to see if the sky will be cloudy in your viewing area here.)

Meteors are space rocks or meteorites that enter the Earth’s atmosphere. When a space rock lands on Earth, the air resistance on the rock heats up, allowing the meteor to be seen in the sky. But it was hot weather that was glowing as the rocks were hot zippers. Through the atmosphere

On display in the museum is a bust of Aristotle.
On display in the museum is a bust of Aristotle.

Meanwhile, meteor showers will be of interest to meteorologists and non-meteorologists. But meteorites are not actually related to the weather. The word “meteorology” was likely to have originated in 340 BC, when the Greek philosopher Aristotle wrote a book on natural philosophy called “Meteorologica”. Known about precipitation, lightning, thunder, geography, chemistry and astronomy. The manuscript was called “Meteorologica” because at that time any particle that fell from the sky was known as a meteorite. Today, astronomers and other space scientists study extraterrestrial meteorites, while meteorologists study the so-called. A “hydrometer” is a particle of water and ice in the atmosphere. Aside from that ancient connection, thanks to Aristotle, there is no physical connection between a meteor shower and the weather on Earth.

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