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The evolution of the ankle and foot gave mammals more legs.



The evolution of the ankle and foot gave mammals more legs.

Creating a Paleocene Mammal that lived about 65 million years ago.Credits: Sarah Shelley.

The results suggest that the evolution of ankle and foot bones of different shapes and sizes helped mammals adapt and thrive after the extinction of dinosaurs.

The results suggest that the evolution of ankle and foot bones of different shapes and sizes helped mammals adapt and thrive after the extinction of dinosaurs.

The increased evolution after a massive extinction 66 million years ago has led to the diversity and success of mammals during a time of great global upheaval, researchers say.

Analysis of the bones that were part of the ankle and heel revealed that mammals during this time ̵

1; the Paleocene Era – were less primitive than previously thought.

Bone measurement

Edinburgh paleontologists made the discovery by comparing the anatomy of Paleocene mammals with species from earlier and present Cretaceous.

They analyzed foot and ankle bone measurements, which provided insights into lifestyle and body size of 40 Paleocene species.The team compared the results with data from both live mammals and pets. Mammals that existed during the Cretaceous period.

Evolving rapidly

Their findings show that Paleocene mammals were structurally stronger and muscular than those of the Cretaceous or the modern era.

Additionally, the animals’ joints are well mobile, supported by ligaments and ligaments – rather than bone traits, like some live mammals, which the team hypothesized to allow them to adapt. And evolved more quickly after extinction.

Escaped calamity

The ankles and feet of many organisms are similar to those of the terrestrial and cavernous mammals that exist today, indicating that these lifestyles are key to addressing them. Survive and prosper after the massive extinction caused by asteroid impacts.

For example, the ability to dig underground tends to help mammals survive the initial devastation, while the loss of tree habitat after an extinction period may be favorable. Of species that live on the ground

The study is published in the journal. Operation of the Royal Society B.

“At the core of our study, we wanted to know what Paleocene mammals were doing in terms of their anatomy and how this relates to aspects of their lifestyle and evolution following the extinction of animal dinosaurs. Paleocene mammals have a tendency to incorporate anomaly. Incomplete anatomy But it is often viewed as ‘ancient’ and as an unskilled precursor to a group of living mammals, what we find is this remarkable variety, they are adapting and developing strongly built bodies. In a way that differs from living mammals, our results Shows one of the many ways mammals can adapt and thrive after the end of the Cretaceous extinction, ”said Dr. Sarah Shelley of the Faculty. Geosciences said.


The asteroid that wiped out dinosaurs could have almost knocked the mammal down, too.


More information:
Sarah L.Shelley, et al. A quantitative assessment of tarsal morphology demonstrates the behavior of curcumin in Palaeocene mammals after the Cretaceous mass extinction. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. (2021). DOI: 10.1098 / rspb.2021.0393

Provided by University of Edinburgh



Reference: The ankle and foot evolution gave mammals a leg up (2021, May 13) .Retrieved May 14, 2021 from https://phys.org/news/2021-05-ankle-foot-evolution-gave-mammals. .html

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