Home / Science / The giant flames that pass through Mars come from a neutron star in a galaxy 11.4 million light-years away.

The giant flames that pass through Mars come from a neutron star in a galaxy 11.4 million light-years away.



The giant flame sweeping through Mars originated from a powerful neutron star in a galaxy 11.4 million light years from Earth.

  • The NASA satellite detected a giant flare in April as it passed through Mars.
  • Scientists say it is from a powerful neutron star, 11.4 million light-years away.
  • This is the highest explosion detection since 2008 by NASA satellites.
  • Dubbed GRB 200415A lasts in milliseconds. But an updated tool is able to collect enough information to trace the path back to its source.

A gigantic flare that blew through the solar system in April sent scientists to probe into space to discover the origin of the high-energy explosion, and the hunt was finally over.

A group of researchers led by the University of Johannesburg revealed that the GRB 200415A explosion was released from a magnetic field, a strong magnetic neutron star located in a distant spiral galaxy. 11.4 million light years away

The elusive visitor flew past Mars in the early hours of April 15, where a large number of satellites, including the International Space Station, triggered a search beyond the Milky Way and to distant galaxies NGC 253.

However, the explosion lasted just 140 milliseconds, but because advanced orbiting instruments were able to capture more data than from previous flare detections 13 years ago.

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Giant flames swept through the solar system in April, sending scientists deep into space to uncover the origin of the high-energy ระเบิด explosion, and the hunt was finally over.

Giant flames swept through the solar system in April, sending scientists deep into space to uncover the origin of the high-energy explosion, and the hunt was finally over.

GRB 200415A was picked up at 4:42 AM ET April 15 by the satellite and was the first giant flare to be detected by NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope since 2008.

Fermi recently detected a blast along with the Swift, Mars Odyssey and Wind satellites and the European Space Agency’s INTEGRAL satellites.

The gamma-ray explosion (GRB) is the brightest and most powerful event in the universe.

These are detected only when a beam of light is directed towards the earth.

The elusive visitor flew past Mars in the early hours of April 15, where a number of satellites, including the International Space Station, sparked a search beyond the Milky Way and to distant galaxies NGC 253. Artist impression)

The elusive visitor flew past Mars in the early hours of April 15, where a number of satellites, including the International Space Station, sparked a search beyond the Milky Way and to distant galaxies NGC 253. Artist impression)

GRB 200415A was picked up at 4:42 a.m. ET April 15 by the satellite and was the first giant flare to be detected by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope since 2008.Fermi recently detected an explosion. Equipped with the Swift, Mars Odyssey and Wind satellites.

GRB 200415A was picked up at 4:42 a.m. ET April 15 by the satellite and was the first giant flare to be detected by NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope since 2008.Fermi recently detected an explosion. Equipped with the Swift, Mars Odyssey and Wind satellites.

Most of these are billions of light years away and can last anywhere from a few milliseconds to a few hours when observed from the Earth.

Scientists have known for a while that a supernova spits a lengthy GRB that would explode for more than two seconds.

In 2017, the team looked at two orbital neutron stars that could give GRB a short time.

The 2017 explosion came from a safe area 130 million light years from Earth.

The researchers believed it was a short-term explosion of gamma radiation, but further investigation revealed it was from a magnetic field.

The researchers believed it was a short-term explosion of gamma radiation, but further investigation revealed it was from a magnetic field.

Professor Soebur Razzaque from the University of Johannesburg said: ‘There are tens of thousands of neutron stars in the Milky Way.’

‘Of those, only 30 are known to be magnetic.’

‘Magnets are a thousand times more magnetic than normal neutron stars.

‘Most of them emit X-rays sporadically, but so far we know a few magnets that have produced giant fireworks. The brightest we detected was in 2004. ‘

‘And then GRB 200415A arrived in 2020’

If the GRB’s next giant flame occurs near our home galaxy like the Milky Way, powerful ground-based radio telescopes like the MeerKAT in South Africa might detect it, he said.

That would be a great opportunity to study the relationship between very high-energy gamma emissions and radio emissions in a second blast. And that will tell us more what works and what doesn’t in our model. ‘

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