Home / Science / The Hubble telescope solves the problem of star dimming.

The Hubble telescope solves the problem of star dimming.



A new discovery from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope helps astronomers solve the mystery of why Orion’s bright red giant Betelgeuse has faded dramatically over the weeks of last year.

In the large red VY Canis Majoris investigation, an astrophysicist at NASA and the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, found that the same process took place on a much larger scale.

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The observations were published in the Feb. 4, 2018 issue of The Astronomical Journal.

“The similarity of this correspondence in VY [Canis Majoris] With Betelgeuse’s dramatic decline recently, and apparently there was an outflow of gas. “Evidence of similar ejection from the surface of a typical red supergiant suggests that intermittent ejection is more common and surface activity or circulation is the key source.”

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In a press conference Thursday from NASA, University of Minnesota celebrity professor Roberta Humphreys explained that Hubble data showed VY Canis Majoris behave like Betelgeuse “steroid addiction”.

The artist's impression of the star colossus VY Canis Majoris reveals the large convection cells and giant curves of the star. Credits: NASA, ESA and R. Humphreys (University of Minnesota) and J. Olmsted (STScI).

The artist’s impression of the star colossus VY Canis Majoris reveals the large convection cells and giant curves of the star. Credits: NASA, ESA and R. Humphreys (University of Minnesota) and J. Olmsted (STScI).

In the case of smaller stars, the researchers said the dimming was caused by a flow of gas that could form dust, temporarily blocking some of the star’s light.

“I think the main thing that happens with these results is the massive ejaculation or the observed ejection of stars in the [Hubble] Images and measurements in the spectrum correlate with the most highly variable and smallest periods in light observed for more than two centuries. Humphries told Fox News on Friday.

“We think this is due to surface convection or activity that causes a large amount of gas expulsion,” she continues. Is something that stands out. “

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“In VY Canis Major – 30 [times the] Mass of [the] “The flow of these gases could be 10 times the mass of Jupiter.”

The arcs of plasma surround the VY Canis Majoris, apparently being driven from it at a distance thousands of times greater than the Earth from the sun and over the last several hundred years.

However, other structures that closely resemble millions of year-old stars that resemble knots are relatively compact, and scientists working with Humphrey were able to detect the most recent eruptions in the 19th and 20th centuries, when VY Canis Majoris faded. Lost one The sixth original brightness

The model noted that the hypergiant had lost as much as 100 times the mass at Betelgeuse, and was now only visible using a telescope.

“This may be more common in red supergiants than scientists think, and VY Canis Majoris is a radical example,” she said at the launch. “It may be the primary mechanism for driving mass loss, which has always been a mystery to the red supergiants.”

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The future of the start is uncertain, but Humphreys said the star “Obviously not”

“This loss of mass will ultimately determine its fate, whether it’s a supernova or a black hole,” she said.


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