Home / Health / The Johnson & Johnson vaccine, a single injection, helps with immune response. Pope Francis received the Pfizer vaccine.

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine, a single injection, helps with immune response. Pope Francis received the Pfizer vaccine.



USA TODAY is keeping tabs on COVID-19 as a pair of vaccines join the U.S. virus battle that has killed nearly 385,000 Americans since the first death was reported in February. Please refresh this page for the latest updates on the coronavirus, including Pfizer and Modena vaccine recipients, as well as other top news from across the USA TODAY Network. Sign up for our Coronavirus Watch newsletter. For updates directly to your inbox Join our facebook group or Scroll through for in-depth answers to reader questions. For everything you need to know about the coronavirus

In the news headlines:

► Johnson & Johnson̵

7;s one-dose COVID vaccine is safe and generates the immune response from early clinical trials, according to a study in the New England Journal of Medicine published Wednesday.

► Scientists at Ohio State University have discovered a new strain of the SARS-Cove-2 virus that causes COVID-19. The new strain is mutated like the one in the UK. But it is more likely to be caused by a strain of the virus already existing in the United States.

► The Vatican confirmed that Pope Francis received the first coronavirus vaccine on Thursday. The 84-year-old has advocated that everyone should be vaccinated, known as the “coronavirus” vaccine. “Ethical choices” do not just for their own health but also for “the lives of others”.

► A global team of researchers arrived in Wuhan, China on Thursday to detect the origin of the coronavirus.

► Pfizer, together with BioNTech to develop the first COVID-19 to be federally licensed, raised prices of 193 brand-name drugs this month. While the median was only 0.5% higher, the price increase was about 5% for Pfizer’s many popular drugs.

► The Mississippi Department of Health says the state is no longer able to make appointments for the coronavirus vaccine due to the need. “Great increase” after Gov.

► Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte announced Wednesday that he is canceling outbreak documents issued by his ancestors. Under the new rules that come into effect on Friday, restaurants, bars, breweries, distilleries and casinos will no longer have to close at 10:00 p.m. and the capacity is not necessarily limited to 50%.

► A new Ipsos survey finds that residents of other countries are more reluctant to get the COVID-19 vaccine than Americans. China ranks highest on vaccine acceptance, with 80% of respondents saying they will get it. France ranks the lowest at just 40%. The US is in the middle with 69%.

► The number of coronavirus deaths in the United States has hit a one-day high of more than 4,300.The country’s overall death toll from the coronavirus has overshadowed 384,000, according to Johns Hopkins University. It is shutting down rapidly, with an estimated 405,000 Americans killed in World War II. The United States had 4,327 deaths on Tuesday.

► California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Wednesday that the state is lifting restrictions on the COVID-19 vaccine for all residents 65 and older, but Los Angeles County, a region that has The hardest hit in the state has said it will continue to pay attention to healthcare workers. Officials said Wednesday that about a third of people have been infected with COVID-19 in the county since the outbreak began.

📈 Today’s numbers: The United States has more than 23 million confirmed coronavirus cases and more than 384,600 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University. Worldwide gross: more than 92.3 million and 1.97 million deaths.

📘 What we are reading: Seasonal flu has disappeared, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health experts discuss how much COVID-19 is spread.Read more here.

In this photo provided by the Vatican Media, an ultra-low temperature refrigerator located near the portrait of Pope Francis in the Audience Hall of Paul VI is ready for a campaign against Covid- vaccination. 19 in Vatican City on January 13, 2021 in Vatican City, Vatican City.
In this photo provided by the Vatican Media, an ultra-low temperature refrigerator located near the portrait of Pope Francis in the Audience Hall of Paul VI is ready for a campaign against Covid- vaccination. 19 in Vatican City on January 13, 2021 in Vatican City, Vatican City.

More college students get COVID than preschool and school-aged children when they return to school.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a study Wednesday that suggested COVID-19 transmission may be more of a problem among students than younger children who go to school.

The study, published in the Agency’s Weekly Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, found that COVID-19 cases did not increase among preschoolers and school-aged children 0 to 10 during the summer and season. Fallen leaves

In contrast, there was a significant increase in the number of cases among young adults 18 to 24 in mid-July and early September, “suggesting that young people may be more involved in community transmission than younger children. ”Said the CDC.

The agency acknowledged that COVID-19 patients were more likely to be underestimated among children and adolescents because asymptomatic infection was more common among these age groups.

Moderna needs at least 3K teenage volunteers to try the vaccine.

Not enough adolescents are enrolled in a trial for Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine, federal officials said this week it could delay the vaccine clearance for this age group.

Moncef Slaoui, science chief of Operation Warp Speed, the government’s vaccination effort, said Tuesday that while the adult vaccine trial had 800 volunteers per day, the teenage trial received only 800 per. month

This study required at least 3,000 participants to provide accurate safety and efficacy data and was FDA licensed.

“It is very important for all of us, for the entire population of America, to be aware that we cannot have that indication unless teenagers aged 12 to 18 decide to join,” Slaoui said.

– Karen Weintraub

Dr. Michael Roche showed his vaccination card Wednesday after receiving Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at a facility for health care workers in Pacoima, Calif.
Dr. Michael Roche showed his vaccination card Wednesday after receiving Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at a facility for health care workers in Pacoima, Calif.

Some Wisconsin hospitals offer the vaccine to staff who do not care for the sick.

Faced with a absence at vaccination clinics and residual doses, some Wisconsin hospital systems offer the COVID-19 vaccine to staff who are not working with patients or in nursing homes under the interpretation of management guidelines. The vaccine priority that federal advisers say is stretching.

At least one hospital system – Advocate Aurora – has opened vaccine appointments for all employees. In other health systems, employees listed as administrators or public relations specialists receive vaccines based on their social media posts.

Wisconsin continues to complete the first phase of its vaccine launch plan, which includes long-term care facilities and healthcare workers, with a focus on front-line hospital staff.

Some hospital decisions to include employees who work from home and not interact with patients have raised eyebrows in Wisconsin and other states.

– Daphne Chen, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

What will COVID-19 be like in the future? The study said it could be other common colds.

SARS-CoV-2 “can join the group … mild and long-term cold-causing human corona virus”, according to a model developed by Emory University and Penn State University.

The model, published Tuesday in the peer-reviewed journal Science, compared the deadly virus to four cold strains of the coronavirus, including the SARS virus and MERS virus, which appeared in 2003 and 2012.

The researchers determined that if the coronavirus continues to spread in the general population and most people have been exposed to it since childhood, it could be added to the list of colds.

The study authors agree that the model makes some known hypotheses about the coronavirus and the common cold. But the take-home message is that “the great need for broad-spectrum vaccinations could be reduced in the near term,” said study author Ottar Bjornstad. Entomology and Biology instructor at Penn State University.

Contributing: The Associated Press

This article originally appeared in USA TODAY: COVID news: WHO Resachers in Wuhan; The Moderna vaccine trial; US death


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