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The oldest map of Europe is a stone slab carved from the Bronze Age.



(CNN) – The researchers say the intricate plaque and pattern dating back to the Bronze Age has been revealed to be the oldest map of Europe, the researchers said.

Using high-resolution 3D surveys and photogrammetry, the researchers examined the slab. Saint-Bélec, again, a carved and partially broken stone fragment that was discovered in 1900 but has been forgotten for almost a century.

Researchers at the French National Institute for Preventive Archeology (Inrap), the UK’s University of Bournemouth, the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and the University of Western Brittany, said the latest study is said to have been conducted. Of the rock has been revealed to be the oldest mapping. Representation of known territories in Europe.

The researchers observed that the topography of the slabs resemble valleys, with lines representing the river networks.

The researchers observed that the topography of the slabs resemble valleys, with lines representing the river networks.

From Bournemouth University

The slabs, with intricate carvings and scattered motifs, have had a tumultuous life: unearthed from a cemetery in western Brittany, thought to have been reused in ancient burials in the late early Bronze Age ( Between 1900 and 1640 BCE, experts say it formed a small coffin-like wall containing human remains. At the time of the excavation, the 12.7-foot-long slab was broken and the top half was torn.

In 1900 it moved to a private museum., And until 1990, it was stored in the National Archaeological Museum in the castle. Saint-Germain-en-Laye In a niche in the castle’s moat in 2014, it was rediscovered in a museum’s crypt.

Studying the newly discovered slabs, researchers found that the carvings resemble maps, with repeating streaks of patterns.

They noticed that its surface was deliberately 3D shaped to represent the valley, with the lines in the rock thought to represent the river network.

The team observed similarities between the carvings and elements of western Brittany’s landscape, with the territories displayed on the slabs appearing approximately 19 miles x 13 miles along the Odet River.

Clément Nicolas, a postdoctoral researcher at Bournemouth University and the study’s first author, told CNN the findings. “Emphasizes the mapping knowledge of the prehistoric society”

But several reasons are not yet known, including why the slabs initially cracked.

“The Saint-Belek slab represents a highly hierarchical political organization territory that tightly controlled the lands in the early Bronze Age, and its destruction could indicate condemnation and rejection.” Colas said.


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