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U.S. judge restricts the use of force by Columbus, Ohio Police: NPR.



Protesters urged Ohio Soldiers and Columbus Police to take their knees together with them in solidarity at a step at the Ohio State House on June 1, 2020 in Columbus, a federal judge ordered the Columbus Police to stop using force. With non-violent protesters

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Protesters urged Ohio Soldiers and Columbus Police to take their knees together with them in solidarity at a step at the Ohio State House on June 1, 2020 in Columbus, a federal judge ordered the Columbus Police to stop using force. With non-violent protesters

Matthew Hatcher / Getty Images

A federal judge ordered police in Columbus, Ohio, to stop using force, including tear gas, pepper spray and rubber bullets, on non-violent protesters, ruling that the officers ran “savage” during the George’s killing protest. Floyd last summer in Minneapolis.

Judge Algenon Marbley of the Southern District of Ohio described the Columbus Police action:

He opened an 88-page comment with a quote from Martin Luther King Jr .: “But somewhere I read about freedom of assembly, I read about freedom of speech, somewhere I read about freedom of the press, somewhere I read. That matter America’s greatness is the right to protest for rights.

Marbley sided with 26 plaintiffs who protested last summer, ruling that “Unfortunately, some members of the Columbus Police Department disregard the rights granted by fundamental principles of American democracy.” The Columbus Police used force “indiscriminately” and there was no provocation during extensive protests last May and June. Came, he wrote

In addition to accusations of non-lethal tactics used by police on non-violent protesters, the case accuses police of a collective punishment – retaliation for one protest. “Who threw water bottles to threaten or ridicule the authorities” by spraying or tearing the pepper, indiscriminately. Whole group gas ventilation according to Marbley. “What’s more, [officers] It sometimes fails to give an audible warning or there is enough time to disperse before less force is used. The judge wrote.

One of the plaintiffs was shot by a bullet, while the police ordered the protesters to disperse the video on the ban. “In other words, there was no time for the protesters to respond,” said Marly, the 31-year-old plaintiff’s knee was shattered and he was unable to walk for five months at the judge’s order. This man also couldn’t walk more than half a mile without “A lot of pain”

The judge stated that “Several witnesses testified of the physical and psychological injuries sustained at the hands of CPD officers while exercising their basic rights to protests and protests” last year.

According to the injunction, Columbus officials were forbidden from using the method. Those “non-lethal forces” against nonviolent protesters, including those praying, confront verbal police and road seizures. This includes body slams, grenades, flash bangs, rubber bullets, mace and repulsion.

Efforts by NPR to contact the Columbus Police Department for comment were unsuccessful.


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