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Will the Oscars be a ‘bothered’ moment as the ratings soar?



NEW YORK (AP) – George Bradley once enjoyed watching the Oscars, the 28-year-old Brit, now living in San Diego, will stay up late home to listen to music.

Even though he is in the right time zone right now. But he didn’t care, and that was mainly the result of the outbreak.

“The growing prominence of the streaming service didn’t win me an Oscar at all,” he said. “You don’t get that fuzzy warm feeling like when you remember a movie from the big screen.”

Whether you̵

7;re wary of love because you love to hate or stop liking Bradley, the award-winning show has suffered since the coronavirus closed theaters and closed live performances. But the ratings flow for the night of the award began before Covid-19 arrived.

In this century, the Oscars had 35 million to 45 million viewers, often behind the Super Bowl. Last year, before the outbreak was announced, the hostless broadcast on ABC had the lowest audience ever – 23.6 million viewers, down 20 percent from the previous year.

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The Golden Globes in the Plague Era were heavier than a year later, down to 6.9 million, a 64% drop from the previous year and barely the best in 2008, the year the writer’s protests forced NBC to broadcast news conferences for. Winner announcement Last year, before the blocking of the show, it had 18.4 million viewers, according to company Nielsen.

In March, Grammy producers avoided the zoom frustrations of other award shows and performances by some of the industry’s greatest stars – to no avail. CBS broadcasts hit 9.2 million viewers on both television and streaming, which is the lowest figure and a 51 percent drop from 2020, Nielsen said.

John Benardo, 52, in Boca Raton, Florida, is a film enthusiast, graduated from film school and screenwriter, and runs a video business for most corporate clients. This year did not go for the Oscars.

“I love movies and wish I could be on the Oscars to win my own award one day,” he said. “I watch every year and enter competitions where I try to pick winners and try to see them all. But something has changed for this year. “

For starters, he hasn’t seen a single film nominated for any of the genres.

“ Maybe I’ll watch ‘Zach Snyder’s Justice League’ instead, it could be shorter, ” Bennardo joked about his Oscar performance.

Like other award shows, the Oscar’s television broadcast was pushed back due to epidemic restrictions and safety concerns. The show was postponed three times earlier in history. But never before The organizers last June were slated for April 25, which is different from the usual February or early March.

It’s the other driving force behind the Oscars fatigue. Another thing, according to the show’s ex-fans, had to watch nominated movies on the small screen and keep track of when and where they were available on streaming and on-demand services. It’s a big blur for some.

Priscilla Visintine, 62, in St. Louis, Missouri, previously lived to watch the Oscars. She attends a party every year, usually dressed for the occasion.

“Of course, the closing of the movie theater has made me lose interest this year,” she said.

Some of the casualties did not give up their favorite award show.

In Knoxville, Tennessee, 50-year-old Jennifer Rice and her 22-year-old son Jordan have been watching the most nominated movies for years. Over the years, she said it was “February Madness” and they kept charts to record their predictions. She also attended the 2019 Oscars for working for a beauty company at the time.

“My other two children, 25 and 19, have no interest in the Oscars. It was something special for Jordan and me, ”Rice said.“ The Oscars pushed us to movies that we might not have picked before. I’m not as excited as this year. But we’re still trying to see everything before the awards ceremony. ”

As real-life difficulties intensify for a large audience, from food insecurity and work disruption to separation from gagging and parenting struggles, awards show. The escape and the lesser-known than in the past, often relying on pre-taped shows and zoom boxes. For the nominees Moreover, the data showed little interest among the younger generation for dating television in general.

Lifelong movie buff and self-made filmmaker Pierre Subeh, 22, from Orlando, Florida, stopped watching the 2019 Oscars.

“We could barely take a 15-second break from TikTok. How can we expect to sit in a four-hour awards ceremony full of outdated commercials and jokes? We are in the process of curating content. We need algorithms to find what we want to see and to show us the best, ”he said.

As a Middle Eastern immigrant Muslim, Subeh also sees little inclusion of his culture in mainstream movies, let alone on the Oscars stage.

“We will only mention when Aladdin was raised. I don’t feel motivated to gather families on Sundays to sit in the four-hour awards ceremony that no one has ever spoken of about our culture and religion. As Muslims, we make up 25% of the world’s population, ”he said.

Jon Niccum, 55, in Lawrence, Kansas, teaches screenwriting at the University of Kansas. He is a filmmaker, goes to film school and works as a film critic. He and his wife host the annual Oscars party, with 30 guests in its heyday, including winners’ pool bets for cash and prizes. This year it will be a family only because of the epidemic. But the betting is ongoing.

And watch all the top movies at home? For the most part, he said, “It’s not very satisfying.” Not satisfied enough to drop an Oscar on television?

“I’ve never missed an Oscar since 45 years ago. I watch it every minute,” Niccum said.

In Medford, NJ, 65-year-old Deb Madison will watch as well, as she was a child and her mother took her to the cinema for the first time.

In 2018, while on an RV road trip with her husband, she took him to town with her bike in Carlsbad, New Mexico, to find a cool spot to watch. Getting back in the dark Another year when she was working for a big reception in Philadelphia on Oscar night, the coordinator laid cables down and provided her with a small TV hidden under the reception desk so she could listen.

This year, trying to keep up with the nominees from the house stopped her excitement, Madison said.

“I’m a red carpet and gown person lover and, ‘Oh my god, I can’t believe she is wearing that. ′ The other thing is, I don’t need to see these actors in their home environment specially, ”she said with a laugh,“ If I missed it this year, it wouldn’t be sad. Nobody has to drop cable this year. But I still love movies. “


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