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Years later, McGahn, a former White House adviser, agreed to testify: NPR.



Don McGahn, a former White House adviser, agreed to testify to the House Judiciary Committee after a two-year court battle with the committee.

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Alex Wong / Getty Images


Don McGahn, a former White House adviser, agreed to testify to the House Judiciary Committee after a two-year court battle with the committee.

Alex Wong / Getty Images

Don McGahn, Trump’s former White House adviser, will testify before the House Judiciary Committee on his role in the former Russian Special Prosecutor Robert Mueller investigation.

McGahn will speak to board members privately only under the terms negotiated by his attorney, the board and the Justice Department. Interviews will be conducted. “As soon as possible,” and the transcript was made public shortly thereafter, according to the court’s lawsuit.

McGahn served as a campaign attorney for former President Donald Trump in 2016 and later served as a White House adviser until 2018.

The deal ended a nearly two-year court battle over McGahn’s refusal to testify before a judicial committee. It was McGahn’s first summons in 2019, after Mueller’s report indicated he would have knowledge of several allegations of Trump’s obstruction. His administration prevented key White House advisers from witnessing the committee hearings on the Mueller investigation.

Interviews are limited to information provided by McGahn in the publicly available portion of the Mueller Report, including incidents involving him personally. He could refuse to answer questions that were beyond that limit. A lawyer for the Justice Department may have told McGahn not to answer certain questions.

However, McGahn can be asked if he believes the Mueller Report accurately reflects his remarks during the investigation and whether those comments are true.

Chairman of the Judicial Committee Jerry Nadler said in a statement on Wednesday: “I am delighted that we have reached an agreement in accordance with the subpoenas, defending the Commission’s constitutional duties in future governance and defending the privilege of the sensitive executive branch.”


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